Reference Example 4

A reference for an entire book is a little different than a journal article reference and it follows the form below.

Author, A. A. (Year). Title of work. Location: Publisher.

First comes the name or names of the authors. The same rules used for articles also applies for books.

Next is the year that the book was published placed in ( ) followed by a “.”.

The title of the work should be in italics and only the first word, first word after a “:” and proper nouns should be capitalized. The book title is followed by a “.”

The reference ends with the location of the publisher and the publisher’s name which are separated by a “:”. The reference ends with another “.”

Below is a snapshot that I took from the front matter of a textbook and from this information I created the corresponding reference.

Example 4

Landy, F. J., & Conte, J. M. (2016). Work in the 21st century: An introduction to industrial and organizational psychology. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons.

 

Reference Example 5

Something called an edited book is pretty common in the scholarly world. In an edited book different authors write the individual chapters. One or more editors who oversee the process and pulls all the material together into a single book. This form of book is different than an “authored” book.

Be careful when assembling a reference for an edited book. It can be more complicated especially when there are multiple authors and editors. It is easy to make a mistake.

Author, A. A., & Author, B. B. (Year). Title of chapter. In A. A. Editor, & B. B. Editor (Eds.), Title of book (pp. xxx-xxx). Location: Publisher.

The reference begins with the author(s) and year of publication as normal.

The title is next followed by a “.”. Use the capitalization rule of only capitalizing the first letter, the first letter after a “:”, and any proper nouns.

After the title use “In” and list the editor or editors, but make sure you use the initials first followed by the last or sur name. Next use (Ed.) or (Eds.) depending on the number of editors. Last follow all of this with a “,”.

The book title should use the same rules as an authored book, but immediately after the title place the page numbers for the chapter in parenthesis. Be sure to use “pp.”.

Finish the reference with the location and publisher.

Below are a two examples.

Clark, L. A., & Watson, D. (1999). Temperament: A new paradigm for trait psychology. In L. Pervin, & O. John (Eds.), Handbook of personality: Theory and research (2nd ed., pp. 399–423). New York: Guilford Press.

Sackett, P. R., & DeVore, C. J. (2001). Counterproductive behaviors at work. In N. Anderson, D. S. Ones, H. K. Sinangil, & C. Viswesvaran (Eds.), Handbook of industrial, work, and organizational psychology: Volume 1 (pp. 145-164). London: Sage.

 

Reference Example 6

Okay . . . even though I can remind students repeatedly about using strong sources I am sure many of you will use weak websites any way. You cannot trust them so they should not be used for academic or professional purposes. Wikipedia is not a good source – even though I love it for personal use. Despite my warnings I am sure because simple ease, in comparison to actually learning how to use Google Scholar and the library “free” resources that your university pays a LOT of money for, many of you will try to skirt my strong recommendation. You will turn to .edu, .org, and .gov websites.

The .edu websites can have working papers, dissertations, conference presentations, and published articles. You should always use the original authoritative published version if available. The other types of manuscript can be questionable.

The .gov websites can contain reliable information and reports, but you must judge each on its merits and uses.

American Psychological Association (2016). Answers to your questions about psychology and human rights. Retrieved from: http://www.apa.org/topics/human-rights/issues.aspx

 

Test Yourself


1. Which of the following references is in correct APA style?

Skinner, B. F. 1948. Walden Two. New York, Macmillan Co.

Skinner, B. F. (1948). Walden Two. New York: Macmillan Company

Skinner, B. F. Walden Two. New York: Macmillan Company, 1948.

 

2. Which of the following references is in correct APA style?

Jones R. G., Stevens M. J., Fischer D. L. (2000). Selection in team contexts. In J. F. Kehoe (Ed.), Managing selection in changing organizations (pp. 210–241). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Jones, Stevens, Fischer. 2000. Selection in team contexts. In J. F. Kehoe (Ed.), Managing selection in changing organizations (pp. 210–241). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Jones R. G., Stevens M. J., Fischer D. L. (2000). Selection in Team Contexts. In J. F. Kehoe (Ed.), Managing Selection in Changing Organizations (pp. 210–241). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

 

3. Which of the following is a properly formatted APA reference?

American Psychological Association (2017). Ethical principles of psychologists and code of conduct. Retrieved from: http://www.apa.org/ethics/code/

American Psychological Association (2017). ETHICAL PRINCIPLES OF PSYCHOLGOISTS AND CODE OF CONDUCT. Retrieved from: http://www.apa.org/ethics/code/

American Psychological Association (2017). Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct. Retrieved from: http://www.apa.org/ethics/code/