Reference Example 1

Where do you find the information from the article to use in a reference? I have pasted the beginning part of a journal article below. Each journal will look differently though so you may need to search a bit.

Example 1

The journal name, year published volume number, and page numbers are in the red box.

The DOI is in the blue box.

The article title is in the green box.

The authors are in the brown box.

Below is the resulting APA style reference.

Richardson, K. M., & Rothstein, H. R. (2008). Effects of occupational stress management intervention programs: a meta-analysis. Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, 13, 69-93. doi: 10.1037/1076-8998.13.1.69

Often you will see a number in parentheses after the volume number. The reference would look something like this.

Richardson, K. M., & Rothstein, H. R. (2008). Effects of occupational stress management intervention programs: a meta-analysis. Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, 13(1), 69-93. doi: 10.1037/1076-8998.13.1.69

I have highlighted it above. This is the issue number and it is also found in the red box above. Technically you don’t need this for most references because most references are not “paginated” meaning that issue numbers don’t restart at page 1. The volume starts at page 1 and each new issue simply continues with the numbering. Some editors and publishers require the issue number, but APA style does not. If you istyle="margin-left: .5in; text-indent: -.5in;"nclude it I won’t object because I think it is easier to locate the article when it is located.

Reference Example 2

Let’s try another journal article example.

Here is the first page. 

Example 2

And here is the reference.

Flanagan, J. C. (1954). The critical incident technique. Psychological Bulletin, 51(4), 327-358. doi: 10.1037/h0061470

The page numbers were not listed so I had to get them from the bottom of each page. Also, although not needed, I included the issue number which was 4.

Even though this is an old article published way before doi’s were introduced articles can be assigned doi’s after the fact and this one happens to have one. To find it I looked it up at http://crossref.org/ which is a non-profit organization that helps to maintain and organization such information for publishers.

Reference Example 3

What if I used Google Scholar and clicked on the actual article link, which is the article title? Most likely you would be taken to the publisher’s website for the article. And you most likely will be asked to pay some outrageous price to access the article. Simply note the information and then proceed to the university’s online library resources where you most likely will be able to get the article for free. Below I show an example of where to find the reference information. Each publisher’s website and even each journal’s web site will look different.

Example 3

The journal name, volume number, and year of publication are found in the red box. Note that the journal title is just “Work and Stress.” The tag line “An International Journal of Work, Health & Organizations” does not get included in the reference.

The article title, authors, and pages are found in the green box. Notice that in the green box it sates it was published online in the year 2010. Do not use this date. Use the original journal publication date. Often journals put older articles online, but always use the original date. Also it is now common for publishers to have early online access or to publish an article online before the full hardcopy journal is available. Use the final hardcopy date (if it exists) as the authoritative date of publication.

Gillespie, N. A., Walsh, M. H. W. A., Winefield, A. H., Dua, J., & Stough, C. (2001). Occupational stress in universities: Staff perceptions of the causes, consequences and moderators of stress. Work & Stress, 15, 53-72. doi: 10.1080/02678370117944

The doi was not included on the webpage. I located the journal article and found it in the footer of the first page. I also looked it up at http://crossref.org/.

Test Yourself


1. Which of the following references is in correct APA style?

Graham, Laurel D. "Domesticating efficiency: Lillian Gilbreth's scientific management of homemakers, 1924-1930." Signs 24.3 (1999): 633-675.

Graham, L. D. (1999). Domesticating efficiency: Lillian Gilbreth's scientific management of homemakers, 1924-1930. Signs, 24, 633-675.

Graham, Laurel D. "Domesticating efficiency: Lillian Gilbreth's scientific management of homemakers, 1924-1930." Signs 24, no. 3 (1999): 633-675.

Graham, L.D., 1999. Domesticating efficiency: Lillian Gilbreth's scientific management of homemakers, 1924-1930. Signs, 24(3), pp.633-675.

Graham LD. Domesticating efficiency: Lillian Gilbreth's scientific management of homemakers, 1924-1930. Signs. 1999 Apr 1;24(3):633-75.

 

2. Which of the following is a properly formatted APA reference for the information shown below?

QuestionImage6 2

Birnbaum, R. (2000). The life cycle of academic management fads. Journal of Higher Education, 1-16.

Birnbaum, Robert (2000). The life cycle of academic management fads. Journal of Higher Education, 1-16.

Birnbaum, R. (2000). The life cycle of academic management fads. Journal of Higher Education, 71, 1-16. doi: 10.2307/2649279

Birnbaum, R. (2000). The life Cycle of Academic Management Fads. Journal of Higher Education, 1-16.

Birnbaum, R. (2000, January). The Life Cycle of Academic Management Fads. The Journal of Higher Education. JSTOR. https://doi.org/10.2307/2649279

 

3. Which of the following is a properly formatted APA reference for the information shown below?

QuestionImage6 3

Rynes, S. L., Giluk, T. L., & Brown, K. G. (2007). The very separate worlds of academic and practitioner periodicals in human resource management: Implications for evidence-based management. Academy of Management Journal, 50, 987-1008.

Rynes, S. L., Giluk, T. L., & Brown, K. G. (2007). THE VERY SEPARATE WORLDS OF ACADEMIC AND PRACTITIONER PERIODICALS IN HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT: IMPLICATIONS FOR EVIDENCE-BASED MANAGEMENT. Academy of Management Journal, 50(5), 987-1008.

Rynes, S. L., Giluk, T. L., & Brown, K. G. (2007). The very separate worlds of academic and practitioner periodicals in human resource management: Implications for evidence-based management. Academy of Management Journal, 50(5), pp. 987-1008.